Texting and Driving Stats/Alcohol Related Accidents

Texting and Driving Stats/Alcohol Related Accidents

  • At any given time throughout the day, approximately 660,000 drivers are attempting to use their phones while behind the wheel of an automobile.

 

General Cell Phone Statistics

  • The National Safety Council reports that cell phone use while driving leads to 1.6 million crashes each year.
  • Nearly 330,000 injuries occur each year from accidents caused by texting while driving.
  • 1 out of every 4 car accidents in the United States is caused by texting and driving.
  • Texting while driving is 6x more likely to cause an accident than driving drunk.
  • Answering a text takes away your attention for about five seconds. Traveling at 55 mph, that’s enough time to travel the length of a football field.
  • Texting while driving causes a 400% increase in time spent with eyes off the road.
  • Of all cell phone related tasks, texting is by far the most dangerous activity.
  • In 2011, at least 23% of auto collisions involved cell phones.
  • The percentage of drivers text-messaging or visibly manipu­lating handheld devices increased from 1.7 percent in 2013 to 2.2 percent in 2014. Since 2007, young drivers (age 16 to 24) have been observed manipulating electronic devices at higher rates than older drivers.

 

Teen Driver Cell Phone Statistics

  • 11 teens die every day as a result of texting while driving.
  • According to a AAA poll, 94% of teen drivers acknowledge the dangers of texting and driving, but 35% admitted to doing it anyway.
  • 21% of teen drivers involved in fatal accidents were distracted by their cell phones.
  • Teen drivers are 4x more likely than adults to get into car crashes or near-crashes when talking or texting on a cell phone.
  • A teen driver with only one additional passenger doubles the risk of getting into a fatal car accident. With two or more passengers, they are 5x as likely.
  • 13% of drivers age 18-20 involved in car wrecks admitted to texting or talking on their mobile devices at the time of the crash.
  • Teens who text while driving spend approximately 10% of their driving time outside of their lane.

 

2013 U.S. Cell Phone and Driving Statistics

  • In 2013, 3,154 people were killed in distraction-related crashes.
  • About 424,000 people were injured in crashes involving a distracted driver.
  • In 2013, 10% of all drivers ages 15 to 19 involved in fatal accidents were reported to be distracted at the time of the crash.

 

2012 U.S. Cell Phone and Driving Statistics

  • In 2012, 3,328 people were killed in distraction-related crashes.
  • About 421,000 people were injured in crashes involving a distracted driver.
  • In 2012, 11% of drivers under age 20 involved in fatal accidents were reported to be distracted at the time of the crash.
  • One-fourth of teenagers respond to at least one text message every time they drive and 20% of teens and 10% of parents report having multi-text message conversations while driving.

 

General Alcohol Driving Statistics

  • In 2012, 15% of all drivers involved in fatal crashes during the week were alcohol-impaired, compared to 30% on weekends.
  • In fatal crashes in 2011, the highest percentage of drunk drivers was for drivers ages 21 to 24 (32%), followed by ages 25 to 34 (30%) and 35 to 44 (24%).
  • 9,967 people were killed in drunk driving crashes in 2014.
  • 10,076 people were killed in drunk driving crashes in 2013 – 1 every 53 minutes.
  • Every day in America, another 28 people die as a result of drunk driving crashes.
  • Of the 1,070 traffic deaths among children ages 0 to 14 years in 2014, 209 (19%) involved an alcohol-impaired driver
  • In 2014, over 1 million drivers were arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol or narcotics.3That’s one percent of the 121 million self-reported episodes of alcohol-impaired driving among U.S. adults each year
  • Someone is injured in a drunk driving incident every 120 seconds.

 

Teen Driver Alcohol Stats

  • Teen alcohol use kills 4,700 people each year – that’s more than all illegal drugs combined.
  • Kids who start drinking young are seven times more likely to be in an alcohol-related crash.
  • Car crashes are the leading cause of death for teens, and about a quarter (25%) of those crashes involve an underage drinking driver.
  • Over 40% of all 10th graders drink alcohol.
  • About 1 in 7 teens binge drink.
  • Every 15 minutes, a teenager will die due to drunk driving.

 

Texting and Driving Statistics for Ages 16-24

  • On any given day in 2014, an average of 6% of drivers, ages 16 to 24, used a hand-held cell phone while driving.
  • In 2013, 10% of all drivers younger than 20 years old involved in fatal crashes were reported to have been distracted while driving.
  • For every mile driven, teen drivers ages 16-19 are three times more likely than older drivers to crash.
  • In 2013, 2,163 teens in the United States ages 16–19 were killed and 243,243 were treated in emergency departments for injuries suffered in motor vehicle crashes. That means that six teens ages 16–19 died every day from motor vehicle injuries.
  • Young people ages 15-24 represent only 14% of the U.S. population. However, they account for 30% ($19 billion) of the total costs of motor vehicle injuries among males and 28% ($7 billion) of the total costs of motor vehicle injuries among females.
  • Per mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are nearly three times more likely than drivers aged 20 and older to be in a fatal crash.
  • A recent study of in-car video footage found that potentially distracting behavior was a factor in 58% of major crashes for this age group; teenagers were using a cell phone in 12% of such collisions.
  • One study showed that using a cell phone while driving, whether hand-held or hands-free, delays a driver’s reactions as much as does having a blood alcohol level at the legal limit of .08%.
  • Potentially unsafe mental distractions can persist for as long as 27 seconds after dialing, changing music or sending a text using voice commands, according to surprising new research by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

 

Resources

  • “Most U.S. Drivers Engage in ‘Distracted’ Driving Behaviors.” USAToday.com. December 1, 2011.
  • “Traffic Safety Facts”. U.S. Department of Transportation: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. April 2015.
  • “What is Distracted Driving? Key Facts and Statistics” NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
  • Schroeder, P., Meyers, M., & Kostuniuk, L. (2013, April). National survey on distracted driving attitudes and behaviors – 2012. (Report No. DOT HS 811 729). Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
  • “Distracted Driving 2013.” National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. April 2015.
  • Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2014). Teen drivers: Get the facts. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/MotorVehicleSafety/Teen_Drivers/teendrivers_factsheet.html
  • U.S. Department of Transportation. (2008). Statistics and facts about distracted driving… Retrieved from http://www.distraction.gov/stats-and-facts/#did